Education General News

BECE to be cancelled, University Entrance Exam to replace WASSCE

BECE to be cancelled, University Entrance Exam to replace WASSCE

Ghana’s new controversial education curriculum to cancel BECE, and replace WASSCE with a University Entrance Exam. Social Media has been buzzing with conversations on the content of the ten points outlined in the information.

The controversial education curriculum will ensure BECE is replaced by a new examination to be called the placement exams at JHS3. Candidates who pass this examination will be enrolled in SHS1 to continue the Core Curriculum programme. The SHS1 students will not study any elective subjects for one year while in SHS1, which is called BS10.

When students progress to SHS3, they will not sit the usual WASSCE by the West African Examination Council instead they will write a university entrance examination and all students who are successful will make it to the University and will be rewarded a Diploma Certificate instead of a WASSCE certificate.

Ghanaians seem divided on the new education curriculum, which the Ministry of Education is yet to officially respond to. Some have argued that the information has been released to test the reaction of Ghanaians, however, these details were also made public when the current curriculum was introduced in 2019

Some have also indicated that the education curriculum is practised in South Africa, and it’s very effective.

“Without consultation with the necessary stakeholders, this government is out with another unpopular educational policy again. Ghanaian politicians should stay away from our educational systems in the country.” Another comment stated.

Another section of Ghanaians has indicated that changing the curriculum is not the solution to our problems in the education sector, but the provision of the needed teaching resources.

The question may have asked is if the BECE is to be cancelled and University Entrance Exam is to replace WASSCE, will that have any impact at all? Others have raised concerns about the changing of the curriculum without the provision of essential materials to ensure effective teaching and learning.

“The issue is not so much with changing curriculum or syllabus. The key problem is the provision and availability of teaching and learning materials. You are introducing technology and computing into the syllabus, but can the government make adequate computers available in all schools across the country? Currently, there is an ICT teacher in my holy village who does not have access to even a mobile phone, he is teaching ICT on the blackboard.” A comment from another commentator.

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